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Category Archives: Thinking Outside the Classroom

How does it work in winter?

The bioclimatic greenhouse

· Leaves solar energy during the day by the south face 

· Stores it during the day 

· Restores it at night or during cloudy sequences 

· Is insulated to reduce heat losses

 

Newsletter du Zoo: Mardi 10 Avril

Bonjour chers parents,

This afternoon, with Madame Jamie, it was animal time in the classroom!!! It’s an opportunity for our students to pet animals, to see them closer, to hear them, and even to smell them sometimes. All the senses help them learn and memorize. 

The first animal was an invertebrate. Roaches are invertebrates. Surprise,  Jamie brought one!! No, not the ones you can see in your house or in New Orleans streets. It wouldn’t be as interesting or fun since you can observe and pet them whenever you want. This one is a Madagascar hissing cockroach! It’s a plant eater. The students who pet it can tell you that it’s very smooth!!

The mammal Jamie brought is Han, the domestic guinea pig. This mammal is a herbivore. 

Tyler, the western hognose snake is a reptile. It has fangs that help him with the preys it eats: amphibians. Snakes use their tongues to smell. 

 Jezebel the hawk! This carnivore eats rodents, lizards, snakes and smaller birds. Jezebel sees very well, however her best sense is their sense of hearing. That’s why hawks are great hunters. 

Most of the zoo animals are from another zoo, however Jezebel is from the wild. She arrived at the zoo with a broken wing. With a missing wing, she can’t fly, and so she is unable to hunt, and couldn’t survive in the wild.

With a food chain, it’s easier to realize that animals and plants are connected to each other. If one link disappears, it does affect other living things. In a ecosystem, we need all kinds of plants and animals, even the small tiny ones that look insignificant. 

Today, we would like to pay tribute to the sun. The sun is the reason food chains exist. Without the sun, there would be be no plants, and without plants there would be neither animals nor Humans.  

The rest of the day, students worked in small groups:

     – they drew some animals.

     – they did exercises about animal classification with Madame Claire.

     – they played the “animal classification” game. with monsieur Ibrahima.

     – they read books in the library.

A demain!!!

Martin, Jinger, Claire & Ibrahima 

La radio LFNO, Episode 5

la-radio-lfnoIn the fifth episode of La radio LFNO, Lycée Français de la Nouvelle-Orléans, students interview Bob MacLean, Audubon Nature Institute senior veterinarian. If you didn’t know about Audubon’s Marine Mammal Rescue Program, listen in!

Liberté !

Summary: Stuck in bad situations, these wild animals find a way to escape.

Thanks to an exciting partnership with the Audubon Nature Institute, our first and third graders participate in programs at Lycée’s very own zoo classroom. Science learning comes to life through interactive activities with animal and plant life.

This short film is an example of final student projects, in which students develop storylines, incorporate specialized vocabulary, and act!

La radio LFNO, Episode 4

la-radio-lfnoIn the fourth episode of La radio LFNO, Lycée Français de la Nouvelle-Orléans, students interview Elaine Broussard, Education Outreach Coordinator at the Audubon Nature Institute, and talk about all the interesting things she does at the zoo.

Père Alligator

Summary: Père Noël is the new Santa in town. But is he friend or foe?

Thanks to an exciting partnership with the Audubon Nature Institute, our first and third graders participate in programs at Lycée’s very own zoo classroom. Science learning comes to life through interactive activities with animal and plant life.

This short film is an example of final student projects, in which students develop storylines, incorporate specialized vocabulary, and act!

Why arts education is important

By Susanna Ritz

Working with Lycée Français students for their week-long residency at the Ogden Museum has had some fantastic results.

For example, these talented 2nd graders have learned to be sharp observers, strengthened their communication skills through discussion, connected visual art to aspects of their own culture, history, and community, and also created wonderful and imaginative artworks.

Something that has stood out to me is how connected students are to the world around them. Sometimes when we think of children, we think of them as living in their own bubble, but they constantly soak up new information and relate it to what they are learning. For example, one student, clearly impacted in some way by recent news, created a portrait collage entitled “Girl in Hijab”. When sharing with the class about her artwork, she commented that she found the clothing and head covering of Muslim women beautiful.

Creating visual art gives students an opportunity to reach a part of themselves that they cannot yet articulate fully, but expressing their thoughts and feelings is a part of their process of understanding and essential to a healthy, well-rounded education.

Suzanna Ritz is an artist who works with our students at the Ogden. 

Welcome to FabLab NOLA!

Sixth graders have begun classes at FabLab NOLA, Lycée’s newest addition to its Thinking Outside the Classroom program. On their first day, students learned to design a project – in this case, Mardi Gras doubloons – on Adobe Illustrator, then print out their design using FabLab’s 3D printer. Within a few hours, students were able to experience the design process on a small yet memorable scale. We can’t wait to see students developing ideas on how design can be used to address issues affecting New Orleans communities, including housing and public spaces.

Spiny dogfish dissection

Fifth graders apply the knowledge they have acquired in anatomy to dissect spiny dogfish specimens.

This and other experiences are part of our Thinking Outside the Classroom program at the Audubon Institute Aquarium of the Americas. To see more of our aquarium classroom, click here.

We should know our history.

One of our students explains why she belives Thinking Outside the Classroom in the French Quarter is so important.

Lycée Français de la Nouvelle-Orléans fourth graders engage in a special project within the French Quarter where they are immersed in the culture and history of France’s 18th Century North American colony. We could not do it without the unwavering support of the Louisiana State Museum and the National Park Service, our history partners.

Exploring the Great Maya Reef

Part of the fifth grade Thinking Outside the Classroom experience at the Audubon Institute Aquarium of the Americas involves snorkeling in the Great Maya Reef with some of the creatures that the children have studied.

Spend a day in the Vieux Carré

Spend a day with our fourth graders as they explore different parts of the French Quarter and trace back history.

Lycée Français de la Nouvelle-Orléans fourth graders engage in a special project within the French Quarter where they are immersed in the culture and history of France’s 18th Century North American colony. We could not do it without the unwavering support of the Louisiana State Museum and the National Park Service, our history partners.

Ils sont fous, ces Français !

Summary: Three friends at a sleepover pass the time reading the newspaper. In doing so, they discover what can happen when wild animals are taken out of their natural habitats.

Thanks to an exciting partnership with the Audubon Nature Institute, our first and third graders participate in month-long programs in the Lycée’s very own zoo classroom. Science learning comes to life through interactive activities with animal and plant life.

This short film is an example of final student projects, in which students develop storylines, incorporate specialized vocabulary, and act!